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ebbf-news

#ebbfmember Henrik Mitsch exploring with ebbf members trust-based leadership relations for Mozilla

#ebbfmember Henrik Mitsch was looking for ideas to co-implement at Mozilla a new organizational and leadership structure based on trust rather than on old strict reporting lines.

He came to the ebbf community, interacted on this topic with the likes of Arthur Dahl, Sjoerd Luteyn and Daniel Truran on “Levels of Trust”, on how these can be built, on the necessary processes and mindsets to implement them.

From that he came up with a “brain model” which was then presented at a Mozilla All Hands session in December. 
It was remixed with other input and they arrived at the “Community Garden Metaphor”.
You can see the outcome of this Mozilla sessions in this article here

Henrik has asked :
“I would be very happy if some of you could have a look at this and let me know your thoughts.”

ebbf-news
ebbf-news

#ebbfdiversity - event presenter Jeff Lynn on the colours and value of diversity

Jeff Lynn will be offering the “Transformational Leadership as a tool for exploiting diversity” learnshop during ebbf’s annual conference and offers these initial thoughts on the theme of the event.
“I’m no artist but I’m guessing that a palette of just one colour would constrain one’s ability to produce great art. Even Malevich changed the colours that he used for his monochromes.

Now, by the very fact that you found this article, you probably see human diversity as a good thing in itself – mainly because you see a lack of diversity requiring exclusion – and that just isn’t just.

However, we are diverse in our experiences and thinking and we currently live in a world where profit and results are the main drivers for most organisations. Diversity will be seen as desirable by some or by others as an imposition. Either way it is usually seen as an add-on. I learnt very early on in my Business …

Read More …

ebbf-news
ebbf-news

Gary Reusche sends a suggested read, mindsets and attitude to help us cope with global population of 11 billion people.

One of the longest serving ebbf members,Gary Reusche, sends his suggested read and whilst we have not read nor can vouch for the contents of this book, thinking of the right mindsets, attitudes and actions that will allow the planet to prosper with a population of 11 Billion people looks like something worth reading about.

“I know Paul Hanley for a number of years as I contributed a chapter in his book “Sprit in Agriculture” published in 2005. Still, when I read the promotional material about “Eleven” I had my doubts about liking the book. I was of the opinion that my view of world events was too radical. Perhaps, I thought, I was becoming cynical, especially of do-gooders espousing feel-good solutions to the ever growing list of catastrophic issues facing the planet. Increasingly believed that “unimaginable horrors precipitated by humanity’s stubborn clinging to old patterns of behavior” was the direction the world was inexorably heading.

Read More…

ebbf-news
ebbf-news

ebbf Sarajevo event brings out the essence of what an ethical company actually looks like

ebbf-sarajevoWe share with you an example of the kinds of local ebbf events, that bring to various parts of the world the learning and exploration of new ideas through ebbf’s meaningful conversations.

This time it is the ebbf Sarajevo team who shares the learning from on of their series of local ebbf events where these five questions were covered:

. What are the differences between ethical and non-ethical businesses?
. In what ways can a company create a good reputation?
. Why is multiculturalism beneficial for an organization?
. Why is it important for people to know the purpose of an organization and their role in it?
. What are the benefits to companies for providing a service to the community?

Read on to view some of the thinking that came out from the conversation …

Arlette George

Rethinking Organisations and #BuildingCapacity with a View of Abundance

screen-shot-2016-09-27-at-18-51-54Vahid Masrour who works for the Wikimedia Foundation led the pre-learning online event ‘Rethinking Organisations and Capacity Building with a View of Abundance’ to give a foretaste of the adventure the ebbf #BuildingCapacity International Learning Event, Bucharest 6 – 9 October is fast becoming.

Participants from Sweden, UK, Romania, Ecuador, Italy, USA enthusiastically discussed their insights of Vahid’s myth-busting accompanying presentation “From Crisis to Abundance: Exponential Organisations” in which he quickly demonstrated how people and organisations unwittingly hold themselves back from creating the adaptive and meaningful workplaces that they seek, by unwittingly maintaining a scarcity mass consciousness mindset.

It turns out, the way we use our own media spaces actually drives our views on scarcity and therefore our views on Abundance too.  We have this tiny amygdala in our brain which triggers reactions to what surrounds us and to what we witness such as impulsive need to fight back, flee danger or become frozen to the spot.  By our daily consumption of ‘bad news’ distributed in mainstream channels and, if we are not careful, our own social media channels we become hooked into media consumption, and unfortunately for us the viewer, we innocently keep ourselves wired into a negative feedback loop through the constant retriggering of the amygdala by consuming stories that reflect and trigger our ‘survival’ instinct states.

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Fit for the 21st Century

Good news on the other hand, decouples us from the negative feedback loop and instead takes us back to the present moment, bringing us face to face with the immense possibilities standing before us in this 21st Century.

To illustrate, Vahid opened up the parameters of what becomes possible when we begin to appreciate stories of progress

Click here to read more…

Arlette George

#BuildingCapacity in a Collaborative Culture - what traits are required and what are the results? with Valerie Davis

s200_valerie.davisHere at ebbf, we are fortunate to have access to Valerie Davis who shared the findings of her PhD research, studying the specific ways in which leaders apply collaborative leadership and the consequences of that mindset in their companies. Earlier this year, she was awarded a Doctorate from Fielding Graduate University for her contributions to research in Human Development and she will be one of the speakers at ebbf’s next international event taking place in a few weeks.

Register now for the conference

Launch of ebbf Research Group for Collaborative Leaders

During this ebbf online leaning session participants from Romania, Italy, Switzerland, China, United Kingdom, Germany, Ireland and United States explored the role of collaborative leaders.

It was a two-fold opportunity, firstly to hear Valerie Davis share her expertise in creating the space for leaders to gain a critical perspective on their goals, vision and effectiveness and secondly to begin the very exciting process of launching a Research

Read More …

ebbf-news
ebbf-news

Johannesburg - Leyla Tavernaro's ideas on rethinking and making virtuous popular talk shows

Leyla Tavernaro HaidarianIn this insightful article published in South Africa’s The Conversation, ebbf member Leyla Tavernaro offers new ideas on how to create enriching as opposed to destroying talk shows, thus offering new ways to use these very influential media opportunities.
Below a couple of excerpts with some of her views:

Denouncing the ‘other’

Talk shows exemplify one prevalent way that communication pans out, particularly in the West. Often, two or more camps are formed. Each side presents and defends its position while challenging or even denouncing the “other”.

For example, “stay-at-home moms” are pitted against “working moms”, implying an inherent conflict of interest between “equality” versus “child care”, as an episode of the “Tyra Banks” show once did. This adversarial model of communication is often replicated in other parts of the world, including the Middle East.

This type of what journalist and scholar Deborah Tannen calls “argument culture” became influential with the ascendancy of Western liberal thought. According to her, it has successfully challenged and confronted oppressive, authoritarian systems but may not be entirely unproblematic.

Addressing full complexity

Its agonistic emphasis excludes many less aggressive or argumentative voices. It reduces issues into binaries, failing to address their full complexity. It also obscures facets of discussion where common ground often does exist. For example, in many cases talk show guests do agree and game show contestants suddenly cooperate. This became particularly apparent in the first season of Endemol’s “Survivor South Africa”, where contestants took a significantly more collaborative posture towards their tasks than their American counterparts.

It would then be compelling to explore what would happen if we engage in a form of public discourse that deliberately draws out collaboration. What if there were common ground between “stay-at-home moms” and “working moms”? As a mother who spends a lot of quality time with her child and still manages to carve out a meaningful career, I am compelled to investigate the efficacy of such framing.

In many such societies like South Africa, globalisation has involved bringing in Western liberal democratic values and systems. They include discourses on human rights or justice that are at odds with local realities.

You can read Leyla’s the full article here

ebbf-news
ebbf-news

Want to join Marjo Lips-Wiersma taking you through a "map of meaning" helping you create a more meaningful workplace?

Marjo Lips-wiersmaebbf member Marjo Lips-Wiersma was one of the participants at the recent ebbf annual conference and also a world expert in the area of Meaningful Work. She will now run a one-off three day workshop on meaningful work in the Netherlands together with Lani Morris (Msc in sustainability and action inquiry from Bath University) Their book on meaningful work, The Map of Meaning has just sold out and they are working on a second edition, which will include case studies of the implementation of their work by many of the participants of their workshops.

We asked Marjo, what are some of the key findings about Meaningful Work?

1)      Blue, pink and white collar workers have the same desire for meaningful work.

2)      Leadership, as it is presently done, does not create meaningful work.

3)      Corporate Social/Environmental Responsibility does not, in itself, create meaningful work.

4)      Meaningful work does not only require consultation, but also the power to change one’s circumstances (the culture and structure of the organisation)

5)      Given their innate spiritual capacity, human beings know what is meaningful (but forget or have too many obstacles put in their way

6)      Creating meaningful work is a bottom up rather than top down process

7)      Meaningful work is holistic concept and as such is  much more than making a difference, or finding one’s life purpose, alone.

Do you want to know how to co-create meaningful work  based on solid-peer-reviewed research findings and ongoing action learning from our by now hundreds of workshop participants? Do you want to immediately apply the workshop knowledge/together with your own expertise and wisdom ? Would you like to generate a case study for the second edition of our book? Would you like the opportunity (but you can decide post-workshop) to become a certified Meaningful Work practitioner through and action learning/reflection/accompaniment process? If so join her workshop.

To see if this one-off opportunity is for you, please go to:  http://www.inpractice.nl/agenda/10-06-2016_introduction+to+the+map+of+meaningful+work/

Marjo is New-Zealand based where she is a Professor/Hoogleraar in Sustainability and Ethics Leadership. She works  in the US, Scandinavia, UK (Oxford) and Europe. The workshop material is designed to be immediately  actioned  and to be used in multiple settings – personal, group, community and organisation.

ebbf-news
ebbf-news

#ebbfmilan - how a design engineer became a global leader using trust, democracy and comfort with uncertainty

Ana Saldarriaga #ebbfmilanWe interviewed Ana Saldarriaga keynoter at ebbf’s annual conference, fifth AIESEC international female and first Colombian president of this global Organization activating the potential of young leaders leadership in over 125 countries. Ana’s keynote and ebbf’s own keynotes at AIESEC’s international and national events continues a 15 year-long active relationship between these two networks that started when ebbf organized one of the first microcredit summits inviting then little known Muhammad Yunus and AIESEC to be protagonists there.

QUESTION: Ana where did your journey to become AIESEC’s global president start?

I come from Medellin in Colombia where I was studying product design engineering. Eager to broaden my experience abroad, I was searching for an exchange program when I came across AIESEC. I went to some of their intro talks at my university and found that this Organization could offer me much more than that.

At University I learnt methodologies to create physical products, in AIESEC I have become an engineer of social change, learning to solve complex problems, solutions oriented approaches to developing people and ideas, instead of products.

The kind of ideas that can transform the lives of people.

Read More …

ebbf-news
ebbf-news

#ebbfmilan - Trip Barthel on the art of consultation, synergy and consensus

trip barthel ebbfmilanYou will be able to enjoy learning from and interacting with Trip Barthel during the upcoming online  pre #ebbfmilan event coming up at 20:00 (CEST) the 28th of April and of course during a number of sessions he will offer during ebbf’s annual conference in Milan ( join us there )

Question: what drew you to the area of consultation, synergy and consensus?

when i graduated from college I was thinking of going to law school but never quite understood the adversarial approach to resolving conflict. What did and still makes more sense to me is to get parties together to find a better mutually beneficial resolution, pretty much flipping on its head everything that law school teaches.

My first step at putting those principles into practice came soon after as the general manager of a small business.

I ran that company for ten years using values and principles that instead of hindering, created very successful financial and personal motivation levels for everyone who worked there, and indeed levels of staff turnover were non-existant, no one wished to leave that environment of justice.


Q: applying values in business seems like a sound principles but why do so many people fail in doing so successfully?

One element is to treat all of our employees in a professional and respectful way, responding as best as we can to their concerns, with most decisions in the office taken as a team and not top down. But most important of all is to create an environment of trust where people feel secure and empowered. People look at their leaders, at the actions more than the words of their managers. Time and again during my professional career I saw how they were waiting for the actions before totally trusting the person and the organisation.


Q: your subsequent work was in the area of legal mediation, what is different in the way you see this taken to its most successful outcome?

Read More …

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