short news from ebbf members

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#BuildingCapacity - first in series of online pre-event learning sessions, created for you

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Capacity building is essential to develop individuals, teams and companies; but which kinds of capacities are most useful to allow thriving and sustainable organizations to be built?
What is the environment and leadership style that allows capacity to be developed?
How can we awaken in individuals the will to develop their capacities?
These are just a few of the questions you can come and explore either in one of the next online pre-event learning sessions (see below the next dates) and / or in Bucharest during the next ebbf international learning event dedicated to this theme.

1. Accompaniment as a foundation of capacity building, with Nabil Elias
Thursday 1st of September at 19:00 CEST / 13:00 EDT
Click here to register for this ebbf online learning experience

2. Building Capacity in a Collaborative Culture, with Valerie Davis
Thursday 8th of September at 20:00 CEST / 14:00 EDT
Click here to register for this ebbf online learning experience

3. Rethinking organizations and capacity building with a view of abundance, with Vahid Masrour

Taking place Thursday September 15th at 20:00 CEST / 14:00 EDT
Click here to register for this ebbf online learning experience

View here the full article

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ebbf-news

#BuildingCapacity - what we learnt in our first pre-event online exploration of "Building Capacity"

Screen Shot 2016-07-26 at 11.44.51It will never be as good as one of these face to face meaningful conversations we enjoy at ebbf’s international learning events (if interested to attend, click here to book still a few places available) but all the same ebbf is offering the opportunity to join online explorations of the themes we will cover in the next international event.

Click here to view your next online learning session opportunity.

Interested to hear what we learnt in one of the online explorations of what building capacity means and of what it takes to create the right culture to allow capacity building in a company?

Read More … 

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ebbf-news

ebbf 2015 annual report - growing the impact of ebbf accompaniment on its members and global community

Screen Shot 2016-06-28 at 13.55.26Click on the image on the left to download ebbf’s 2015 annual report

with a few of the highlights of ebbf’s activities and results from the last ebbf financial year of 2015.

It includes ebbf’s first attempt at measuring the global impact of ebbf’s activities,
and a report of ebbf’s local activities complementing the two main international learning events,  in a growing number of cities around the world including New York, Rotterdam, Stockholm, Hong Kong, Amsterdam, Toronto, Basel, Utrecht, Quito, Lisbon, Geneva, London, Milan, Guam, Zurich.

Not a member yet? Contribute actively to ebbf’s positive impact joining here.

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ebbf-news

Washington - global views on local Brexit and on wider together vs divided debates. by Augusto Lopez-Claros

Augusto Lopez-Clarosebbf member Augusto Lopez-Claros offers some fresh global views to a local issue with much wider consequences.

“Why would Brexit be a blunder of historic proportions?

Since the vast majority of the problems which humanity faces today are global in nature, the world needs more, not less international cooperation. Major planetary issues are being neglected—we are failing massively and risking being overwhelmed by a broad range of problems the solutions to which require effective “problem solving” mechanisms and institutions. The list of inherently global issues that are insoluble outside a framework of global collective action involving most nations of the world is long and includes: climate change, biodiversity loss, the depletion of tropical forests and fisheries, nuclear proliferation, widening income disparities, a flawed global financial architecture, illegal drugs, the rise of terrorism and the still high levels of poverty and deprivation afflicting much of the developing world, to name a few.

Against this background, those who argue that the United Kingdom would be better off outside the EU do not seem to understand the extent to which economic integration has been a key driver of prosperity during the past half a century and the extent to which membership in a body such as the EU is a way to magnify a country’s voice and influence, as we rise to the challenge of helping resolve the above global problems.

Is EU membership beneficial?
EU membership has been highly beneficial to the United Kingdom. It has contributed to a huge increase in trade and to gains in productivity and economic output. It has given its politicians the opportunity to influence and shape EU policies in areas that have had a major impact in the world, such as the enlargement of the EU to Central and Eastern Europe that took place after the collapse of the Soviet Union and that did so much to transform these countries’ institutions and policies. Because the EU is the world’s largest trading bloc, it has huge clout when it comes to opening other countries’ markets and, as a member, the United Kingdom has greatly benefited from these efforts. Furthermore, contrary to the assertions of supporters of Brexit, the United Kingdom has not been prevented by EU membership from carving out approaches to particular issues that better suited its own preferences and interests. So, it has a very flexible labor market, which has contributed to lower levels of unemployment than in the rest of the EU, it has a friendly business environment that tends to be less overregulated than the rest of the EU (Denmark and the UK have the highest rankings in the EU in the World Bank’s Doing Business report), and it has maintained its own currency,.

Over the past several decades there have been massive shifts in the structure of the global economy. High economic growth rates in countries like China, India and other parts of the developing world have drastically reduced the relative size of countries like the United Kingdom. Because political power and influence are highly correlated with economic size, the United Kingdom, as an active member of the EU, has managed to maintain a degree of influence in global affairs that has gone well beyond its actual (and relatively declining) economic size.

It is highly irresponsible to argue that outside the EU the United Kingdom will be anything other than a minor power in a world of emerging economic and political powerhouses. This process will be accelerated if, as is widely expected, Scotland opts to stay in the EU by claiming independence. The EU will remain, for the foreseeable future, the United Kingdom’s most important trade partner. But because trade with the EU is far more important to the United Kingdom than trade with the United Kingdom is for the EU, it will be the case that the EU will largely dictate the terms of access to its enlarged market. That access, by virtue of Brexit, will, of course, be less preferential than for full EU members. Indeed, negotiating the terms of separation and the features of the UK’s new relationship with the EU is likely to create a long period of uncertainty for the economy, with exporters in the country asking themselves: how long?, on what terms? and not having ready answers to such vital questions. It is also naïve to think that, outside the EU, London will retain its unique position as one of the world’s two largest financial centers (together with New York). To the extent that finance has been an engine of economic growth over the past several decades, leaving the EU will have a permanently contractionary effect on the UK economy.

Indeed, all that the United Kingdom can hope for is an eventual relation with the EU that is similar to that which Norway has and which involves, ironically, largely accepting the bulk of EU laws, without having a say in their formulation, including, of course, the free movement of people.

One final word on migration.

The sooner we find creative ways to live in a multinational, multiethnic world, the better. It is not only large income disparities that create incentives for people to move. There are other forces at work that are likely to remain with us for some time to come and that could turn migration into one of the main development challenges of our time.

One of them is the shrinking of our planet fueled by rapid changes in technology and globalization. Our societies are far more mobile today than used to be the case. The real cost of travel has fallen precipitously in recent decades and people feel far less rooted to their place of birth than in the past. More and more people, particularly the young, feel like global citizens, very much at ease with the concept that

“The earth is but one country and mankind its citizens.”

More importantly, we live in a world in which we face a broad range of global problems for which we do not seem to have the adequate institutions to find workable solutions. And the sense of insecurity that these problems feed can often act as a powerful additional incentive for people to want to move, to seek opportunities and a better life elsewhere, since many of these global problems have had and will continue to have a disproportionately larger impact on the developing world. Furthermore, in coming decades, with rising sea levels linked to global warming, we are likely to have to deal with the problem of “environmental refugees”; potentially dozens of millions of people who will have to be resettled in other parts of the world.

So, to those who argue that by leaving the EU Great Britain will be able to turn itself into Little England, isolated from the rest of the world: dream on. It is not going to happen. Migration has been, over the past several hundred years, one of the most powerful engines of economic growth, innovation and prosperity. All we can hope to do is to manage it in a way that enhances its benefits and smooths out its at times destabilizing effects.

So, where will all of this end?
One possible scenario: Britain will spend three years trying to get out and the next three trying to get back in, when it fully realizes the magnitude and ramifications of its blunder.”

ebbf-news
ebbf-news

Johannesburg - Leyla Tavernaro's ideas on rethinking and making virtuous popular talk shows

Leyla Tavernaro HaidarianIn this insightful article published in South Africa’s The Conversation, ebbf member Leyla Tavernaro offers new ideas on how to create enriching as opposed to destroying talk shows, thus offering new ways to use these very influential media opportunities.
Below a couple of excerpts with some of her views:

Denouncing the ‘other’

Talk shows exemplify one prevalent way that communication pans out, particularly in the West. Often, two or more camps are formed. Each side presents and defends its position while challenging or even denouncing the “other”.

For example, “stay-at-home moms” are pitted against “working moms”, implying an inherent conflict of interest between “equality” versus “child care”, as an episode of the “Tyra Banks” show once did. This adversarial model of communication is often replicated in other parts of the world, including the Middle East.

This type of what journalist and scholar Deborah Tannen calls “argument culture” became influential with the ascendancy of Western liberal thought. According to her, it has successfully challenged and confronted oppressive, authoritarian systems but may not be entirely unproblematic.

Addressing full complexity

Its agonistic emphasis excludes many less aggressive or argumentative voices. It reduces issues into binaries, failing to address their full complexity. It also obscures facets of discussion where common ground often does exist. For example, in many cases talk show guests do agree and game show contestants suddenly cooperate. This became particularly apparent in the first season of Endemol’s “Survivor South Africa”, where contestants took a significantly more collaborative posture towards their tasks than their American counterparts.

It would then be compelling to explore what would happen if we engage in a form of public discourse that deliberately draws out collaboration. What if there were common ground between “stay-at-home moms” and “working moms”? As a mother who spends a lot of quality time with her child and still manages to carve out a meaningful career, I am compelled to investigate the efficacy of such framing.

In many such societies like South Africa, globalisation has involved bringing in Western liberal democratic values and systems. They include discourses on human rights or justice that are at odds with local realities.

You can read Leyla’s the full article here

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ebbf-news

share your impact, join the #ebbfimpact campaign

share your #ebbfimpact - bannerWe wish to show the global impact that people like you are making through your daily meaningful actions, inspired by an ebbf event, conversation, member or article.

Share as often as you wish using this dynamic microsite the people you have impacted and actions you have taken.

As you submit you action, you will see the colour of your country change, depending on the number of people impacted and the total counter of #ebbfimpact grow, thanks to your recent action.

share now your impact and visualise the global map of #ebbfimpact

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ebbf-news

Want to join Marjo Lips-Wiersma taking you through a "map of meaning" helping you create a more meaningful workplace?

Marjo Lips-wiersmaebbf member Marjo Lips-Wiersma was one of the participants at the recent ebbf annual conference and also a world expert in the area of Meaningful Work. She will now run a one-off three day workshop on meaningful work in the Netherlands together with Lani Morris (Msc in sustainability and action inquiry from Bath University) Their book on meaningful work, The Map of Meaning has just sold out and they are working on a second edition, which will include case studies of the implementation of their work by many of the participants of their workshops.

We asked Marjo, what are some of the key findings about Meaningful Work?

1)      Blue, pink and white collar workers have the same desire for meaningful work.

2)      Leadership, as it is presently done, does not create meaningful work.

3)      Corporate Social/Environmental Responsibility does not, in itself, create meaningful work.

4)      Meaningful work does not only require consultation, but also the power to change one’s circumstances (the culture and structure of the organisation)

5)      Given their innate spiritual capacity, human beings know what is meaningful (but forget or have too many obstacles put in their way

6)      Creating meaningful work is a bottom up rather than top down process

7)      Meaningful work is holistic concept and as such is  much more than making a difference, or finding one’s life purpose, alone.

Do you want to know how to co-create meaningful work  based on solid-peer-reviewed research findings and ongoing action learning from our by now hundreds of workshop participants? Do you want to immediately apply the workshop knowledge/together with your own expertise and wisdom ? Would you like to generate a case study for the second edition of our book? Would you like the opportunity (but you can decide post-workshop) to become a certified Meaningful Work practitioner through and action learning/reflection/accompaniment process? If so join her workshop.

To see if this one-off opportunity is for you, please go to:  http://www.inpractice.nl/agenda/10-06-2016_introduction+to+the+map+of+meaningful+work/

Marjo is New-Zealand based where she is a Professor/Hoogleraar in Sustainability and Ethics Leadership. She works  in the US, Scandinavia, UK (Oxford) and Europe. The workshop material is designed to be immediately  actioned  and to be used in multiple settings – personal, group, community and organisation.

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ebbf-news

#ebbfmilan - a few first highlights from the ebbf annual event

Screen Shot 2016-05-16 at 16.31.58A few Highlights from our recent ebbf annual event we enjoyed in Milan.

Click here to view :

http://sfy.co/x8Ky

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ebbf-news

Join ebbf, a global learning community using work to build a new civilization

You can join ebbf and become part of a global community, present in over 50 countries, that accompanies people exploring how to use their workplaces or new economic systems to build a new, more prosperous, just and sustainable civilization. View here video interviews with some ebbf members sharing why they joined ebbf and how they contributed.

With your annually renewable membership you will also gain:

  • access to the members platform connecting you to a global network of inspiring individuals
  • the opportunity to join “meaningful conversations” leading to action, on one of ebbf’s “meaningful hangouts”
  • taking part in the weekly “unlocking the potential of your membership” hangout video conference connecting with members around the world and asking the ebbf team to accompany you
  • access to the “SOS ebbf” service allowing you to ask your ebbf community for advice, help and ideas
  • member-only discounts at ebbf and partner organizations’ international events
  • becoming an active protagonist, joining an ebbf team, creating new ebbf tools
  • access to the “creating your dream enterprise” service, guiding you from the idea to the reality of the enterprise you always wanted to set up.
  • becoming part of the “ebbf accompaniment” service, accompanying you on a path of increasing influence in your current and future work
Full annual fee:€ 120
Young Professional annual fee:€ 50
Student / Unemployed annual fee:€ 25
5-year membership fee:€ 500
Life time membership fee:€ 2,000

Apply to become an ebbf member now!

Diana Severati
Diana Severati

#ebbfmilan - Stephanie Bouju: "Come to an inspiring, inclusive conference!"

stephanie-boujouStephanie Bouju will join the next conference in Milan. I asked her some questions about her previous ebbf experiences.

Q: Was there a specific action or something you wanted to try as a result of your conference? How is that going?
A: The last conferences have taken me on a journey of self discovery. They widen my horizon about what having a meaningful career and leaving my values could mean, showing me inspiring examples from entrepreneurs, to regular employees to CEOs. I am still on the journey to explore how to apply it in my life and career, and how to overcome some of my fear to aim higher.

Q: What and where has been the last impact you created?
A:Not sure… It is more a personal journey for now.

Q: If you were inviting someone to come to the next conference in Milan, what would you say?
A: Come to an inspiring, inclusive conference, where you will engage in the unusual yet so important subject of how to be practical in our work about the aspirations of our higher self.

Q: Last but not least, could you share one or more favourite quote?
A: “Constants in life… change, choice and principles.” – Covey
“All men have been created to carry forward an ever advancing civilization.” – Baha’u’llah

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